Post-Holiday Blahs? Clothes Can Lift Your Spirits

19 Jan
art, clothing and mood, wefly2, Calvin Charles, Ladies' Home Journal, disabled women, disabled shopping

From exhibit at the Calvin Charles Gallery, Scottsdale.

Maybe the excitement of the holidays has left you feeling a bit hollow, like the fellow in the photo (no disrespect to the artist). Perhaps the weather is draining you, leaving you with a winter virus or aggravating your disability. I hope not. But if you need a simple pick-me-up that won’t drain your wallet or require one more social engagement, you need look no further than your closet, according to writer Sarah Hepola in a recent issue of Ladies’ Home Journal. A self-confessed yoga-pant aficionado, Hepola discovered that slipping on a nice dress and pair of shoes, just because she felt like it, made her feel special and perked up her whole day in a way that schlepping around in yoga pants and an old tee shirt did not.

The Mood-Fashion Connection

No doubt, we live in an ever more casual culture. Hepola brings up Casual Fridays in the workplace to illustrate this point.  But just because we can dress casually, she says, doesn’t always mean we should. In fact, a friend of mine, Kevin, openly rebelled against Casual Fridays. He wore three-piece suits and various tasteful combinations of sport coats, ties, trousers, and pocket watches to work. He was among the few contractors to obtain a full-time position with his company, and his dapper appearance was not lost on the ladies, either!  In a social setting, the lobster effect can occur, with peers thinking their friends should dress the ultra-casual way they do: sometimes my retired friends put on shorts and tee shirts for happy hour, and ask me why I am “so dressed up” when I don trouser jeans with a nice top and makeup. My usual answer is “Why not?” but I like Hepola’s friend’s answer better: “I’m dressed up for me!”

While my outfit of trouser jeans and top hardly qualifies as “dressed up,” it appears that way to some. The point is that wearing snappy clothes that flatter you flips an internal switch somewhere. Your attitude, your confidence, climb. Whether it’s a dress at work or well-fitting jeans at home, the clothing makes you feel good about yourself. What could possibly be wrong with that?

Confined to the House? Cozy Up in Your Faves

Feeling under the weather? Unfortunately, it is common this time of year. No reason you shouldn’t be as warm and comfortable as possible. If you are strong enough to bathe or have a caregiver help you do so, washing up and slipping into your favorite nightgown, pajamas, or lounge wear before going to bed is a definite mood enhancer. Soft, clean-smelling fabric against your skin may not reduce your fever or eliminate your aches and pains, but it can help you relax and rest more easily. Comfy pajamas, your favorite hot beverage, a good book, TV show, or friend, and you’re set. Right now, how your pj’s make you feel definitely trumps how they make you look. You can think about that later.

Feeling Just Right

You don’t have to follow the crowd in your clothing choices to dress appropriately or feel great about what you wear, although the occasion often shapes our outfits, and most of us don’t want to be ridiculed. At the beginning of the year, when I attended a fundraiser for HALO, a local no-kill animal shelter, I intended to wear the purple cowl-necked dress the Spashionista chose for me (see earlier post) with black tights. Well, I had both a wardrobe and disability malfunction: the tights (my only pair) had a hole in them, and my calves were swollen, a side effect I can’t predict. At the last minute, I threw on trouser jeans, my CABI jacket (see Christmas post) and a brown cami. My ensemble fit right in with the rest of the attendees’, and my swollen calves were out of sight!

Whether the post-holiday portion of the new year finds you tired of shopping, nursing a cold, or raring to explore new lands and stores, keep the clothing-mood connection in mind. You may not have to spend a dime to lift your spirits!

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